Garland's Navajo Rugs featured in Sedona Monthly Magazine

November 14, 2018

When you think of Native American art in Sedona, some family names come to mind: Hoel, Wilcox and, of course, Garland. The Garland family moved to Sedona from Phoenix in 1970 (they had spent years vacationing in Oak Creek Canyon), and in 1972, patriarch Bill Garland opened Garland’s Oak Creek Lodge. Not all families can work together, but it seemed to come natural to the Garlands.

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Hanging Your Navajo Weaving

November 06, 2018

How to Hang Your Navajo Rug with Velcro. In our experience, Velcro is the easiest way to hang a rug. If you purchase a Navajo Rug from Garland's, we will provide you with Velcro for free if you wish to hang your rug on a wall. The velcro is self-adhesive and you can stick it directly to most surfaces.

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Introducing Our New Website!

October 20, 2018

For the first time ever, browse the entire collections of BOTH of our store locations, all on one website. This includes Jewelry, Navajo Rugs, Kachinas, Pottery, Baskets, and much more...

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The Story of the Paralyzed Kachina and the Blind Mudhead

September 11, 2018

The Hopis have a legend they retell about two Kachina spirits – Tuhavi (Paralyzed Kachina) and the Koyemsi (Blind Mudhead). Many years ago the tribe had to move from where they lived, either because of drought or warfare. With no horses, they were forced to travel on foot. Two members could not make the journey. 

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Navajo Rugs

September 03, 2018

All of our rugs are woven by Navajo weavers, most of whom live traditionally on the Navajo Reservation which is located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. This is the largest American Indian Reservation in the country, some 16 million acres with over 400,000 Navajos. From the inception of weaving by the Navajos around 1700, weaving has provided an important economic benefit to the tribe and a fine outlet for their artistic talents. Their rugs are made in the weaver's home or hogan on vertical looms using the same methods they have used for the past three hundred years. 

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Common Hopi Kachinas and their Meanings

July 24, 2018 1 Comment

Central to Hopi religion, Kachinas are supernatural beings believed to live on the San Francisco Peaks near Flagstaff, Arizona. Hopi men embody the Kachina spirits during ceremonies that take place between Winter Solstice and mid-July. The Hopis believe these spirits enable them to live in harmony with nature, ensuring rain, crops, fertility, and good hunting.

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Common Zuni Fetish Carvings and their Meanings

July 03, 2018 1 Comment

This ancient art form is rooted in complex Zuni religious beliefs. Zuni Fetishes are hand carved "animal totems" from the Zuni tribe in New Mexico. Fetishes were shaped from organic material to serve as abodes for spirits, and would impart their powers to those who carried them. The Zunis believe that the animal shares some of its traits with the bearer of a Fetish Carving. Each Zuni Fetish Animal has a different meaning and is used for different purposes.

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Navajo Yei and Yei-be-chai

March 22, 2017

“Yei” (pronounced “yay”) is the Navajo name for the benevolent supernatural beings who bring their healing power to medicinal ceremonies still performed today.

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What is the difference between stabilized and natural turquoise?

February 12, 2017 4 Comments

Turquoise by nature is a relatively soft, porous stone, and it can vary greatly in its quality.   Only rarer high-grade turquoise is actually dense enough that it can be cut and shaped without damaging the stone.  Softer turquoise has to be treated in some way in order for it to be made usable.  Therefore, the majority of turquoise has been enhanced in some way.  The resulting piece of turquoise is then much stronger and easier to cut, polish, and set by a jeweler without risk of breaking.

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The Native American Bola Tie: FAQ

February 12, 2017

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, scarf slides made out of leather or metal pieces, shells, claws, or animal teeth, were popular attire for both natives and non-natives.   Then in the 1920s and 1930s, American cowboys began wearing scarf slides on their neckerchiefs made by Zuni artists that were carved out of sheep bone and decorated with beadwork, the most common design being a steer-head shape.  From there, scarf slides were crafted out of metal and turquoise by Native Americans, and morphed into the bola tie we know today.

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Clay to Silver: Southwest Indian Seed Pots

February 12, 2017

Historically, the world has valued containers as both utilitarian and sacred objects.  The Southwest Indians stored their life giving seeds over the winter in clay pots, and the pots had a small hole to keep the seeds safe from vermin.  The seeds came from their three sacred plants: corn, squash, and beans.  At the beginning of the planting season they would need to shatter the clay pot to retrieve the life giving seeds.

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Man in the Maze

October 13, 2016

The iconic "Man in the Maze" (I'Itoi) symbol is an ancient design originally found on Tohono O’odham baskets. This prehistoric pattern, symbolizing one’s journey through life, also is the seal of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. The legend of the “Man in the Maze” helps children understand the meaning of life.

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Sizing

Although the best way to test the size and fit of a piece of jewelry is to try it on in the store, we know that is not always an option. In an effort to help you choose the piece that is right for you, we have included measurements of each piece on the website. Here is how our measurements are defined:

Bracelets

Finding the right size bracelet for your wrist has always been a tricky endeavor, since, unlike rings, there isn't a standardized, universal sizing chart for wrist size. One reason for this is that we all have different shaped wrists, some of us have round wrists, while others have more oval. Bracelets, like wrists, also have different shapes.

So, while bracelet sizing will never be an exact science, we've done what we can to ensure the greatest chance of a comfortable fit. The best thing you can do if you don't know your wrist size is to take a soft measuring tape and loosely measure the circumference of your wrist at the point you plan on wearing it. Try not to have the measuring tape dig into your skin, as this will result in a smaller than ideal size. Once you have the circumference of your wrist, compare it to the chart below to find the correct bracelet size. If your wrist measures in-between two sizes, we recommend rounding up to the larger size. (ie: if your wrist measures 6.375"- you should shop for size "Medium" bracelets.)

 Wrist Circumference

Corresponding Bracelet Size

5.5"

XX-Small

5.75"

Extra-Small

6"

Small

6.25"

Small-Medium

6.5"

Medium

6.75" - 7"

Medium-Large

7.25"

Large

7.5"

Extra-Large

7.75"

XX-Large

8"

XXX-Large

 

You may want to drill down further on the bracelet sizing to make sure the cuff is a comfortable fit. You will notice on our website that we generally list four measurements for bracelets:

Keep in mind that certain bracelets can be adjusted slightly to fit your wrist, but those with inlay or stones all the way around will be damaged if bent. In any case, it is always best to check with with us to see if a particular bracelet is adjustable.

Lastly, have no fear! If you order a bracelet that doesn't fit, send it back for one that does! We want this to be a positive experience, you should never wear something that isn't 100% comfortable. More on our return policy here.

Buckles

Sizing belt buckles is pretty straightforward. The height and width are self-explanatory, and the belt width describes the maximum belt width the buckle will fit on.

Concha Belts

We try to include the height and width for the conchas, as well as the buckle (if different), and the width of the belt they are on. The length of the concha belts can be less important, because these belts are often made quite long to accommodate many waist sizes, and then can be shortened to fit the wearer. If you are concerned whether or not a belt will fit you, just ask. We are happy to size most of our concha belts before shipping.