Hanging Your Navajo Weaving

Hanging Your Navajo Weaving with Velcro

In our experience, Velcro is the easiest way to hang a rug. If you purchase a Navajo Rug from Garland's, and wish to hang it on a wall, we will provide you with an appropriate amount of 2" self-adhesive velcro tape for free.

To hang your rug, cut the velcro to the width of your weaving. Remove the backing off the velcro tape and stick it to the wall from corner to corner along the top edge of the weaving to evenly support it. You can use any extra Velcro to stick under the bottom edges of the rug, as this ensure the rug lays perfectly flat against the wall.

In some cases you may wish to protect your wall surface. If so, we recommend attaching the Velcro tape to a wood strip. Instructions for this process are below:

Step 1:

Peel off the backing of your 2” self-adhesive Velcro tape. Make sure you have enough Velcro to run a strip from corner to corner along the top edge of the weaving to evenly support it.

Step 2:

Adhere the Velcro tape to a thin strip of wood such as lattice or a wide yard stick.  Again, make sure the length of the wood is equal to the width of your rug.

 Step 3:

Nail the wood to the display surface or suspend it from the surface on wire that has been run through "eye hooks."

Step 4:

After the wood strip is in place, just press the Navajo weaving up against the Velcro tape for display.  It holds the weaving in place beautifully.

Learn More About Navajo Rugs

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Sizing

Although the best way to test the size and fit of a piece of jewelry is to try it on in the store, we know that is not always an option. In an effort to help you choose the piece that is right for you, we have included measurements of each piece on the website. Here is how our measurements are defined:

Bracelets

Finding the right size bracelet for your wrist has always been a tricky endeavor, since, unlike rings, there isn't a standardized, universal sizing chart for wrist size. One reason for this is that we all have different shaped wrists, some of us have round wrists, while others have more oval. Bracelets, like wrists, also have different shapes.

So, while bracelet sizing will never be an exact science, we've done what we can to ensure the greatest chance of a comfortable fit. The best thing you can do if you don't know your wrist size is to take a soft measuring tape and loosely measure the circumference of your wrist at the point you plan on wearing it. Try not to have the measuring tape dig into your skin, as this will result in a smaller than ideal size. Once you have the circumference of your wrist, compare it to the chart below to find the correct bracelet size. If your wrist measures in-between two sizes, we recommend rounding up to the larger size. (ie: if your wrist measures 6.375"- you should shop for size "Medium" bracelets.)

 Wrist Circumference

Corresponding Bracelet Size

5.5"

XX-Small

5.75"

Extra-Small

6"

Small

6.25"

Small-Medium

6.5"

Medium

6.75" - 7"

Medium-Large

7.25"

Large

7.5"

Extra-Large

7.75"

XX-Large

8"

XXX-Large

 

You may want to drill down further on the bracelet sizing to make sure the cuff is a comfortable fit. You will notice on our website that we generally list four measurements for bracelets:

Keep in mind that certain bracelets can be adjusted slightly to fit your wrist, but those with inlay or stones all the way around will be damaged if bent. In any case, it is always best to check with with us to see if a particular bracelet is adjustable.

Lastly, have no fear! If you order a bracelet that doesn't fit, send it back for one that does! We want this to be a positive experience, you should never wear something that isn't 100% comfortable. More on our return policy here.

Buckles

Sizing belt buckles is pretty straightforward. The height and width are self-explanatory, and the belt width describes the maximum belt width the buckle will fit on.

Concha Belts

We try to include the height and width for the conchas, as well as the buckle (if different), and the width of the belt they are on. The length of the concha belts can be less important, because these belts are often made quite long to accommodate many waist sizes, and then can be shortened to fit the wearer. If you are concerned whether or not a belt will fit you, just ask. We are happy to size most of our concha belts before shipping.