The Storm Pattern, A Navajo Weaving Design

The Storm Pattern, A Navajo Weaving Design

The Storm Pattern is a well-known regional style in Navajo weaving which originated in the western part of the reservation near Tuba City and Kayenta. It is an older design and one of the few Navajo rugs that tells a story.

Father Sky and Mother Earth, a Navajo Creation Story

Father Sky and Mother Earth, a Navajo Creation Story

The first creation of the Great Spirit was Father Sky and Mother Earth, from whence all life sprang. The crossing of their hands and feet signifies the union of heaven and earth, bound eternally together by the Rainbow Guardian. Regardless of in which direction we may look, we find sky and earth fused as one on the horizon. The physical earth and sky or mind must function together to produce new life. All things are conceived first in thought before they become physical manifestations. This is the meaning of the line running from the head of Father Sky to the head of Mother Earth.

The Fascinating History of Navajo Rugs: Exploring the different periods of Navajo Weavings

From the inception of Navajo weaving around 1700, weaving has provided an important economic benefit to the Navajo tribe and a fine outlet for their artistic talents. Today, Navajo rugs are made in the weaver's home or hogan on vertical looms using the same methods they have mastered for over three hundred years. 

Germantown Weavings (1875 - 1900) An Explosion of Color in the Late 19th Century

Beginning in 1870 to 1875, the Navajo weavers began to have access to commercially spun and dyed wool yarns. The earliest were often three ply yarns, which is one method of dating older weavings. After 1875 the yarns were mostly 4 ply and provided by the early traders to some of their better weavers. The majority of these commercial wool yarns were produced at the mills at Germantown, Pennsylvania.

Garland's Navajo Rugs featured in Sedona Monthly Magazine

When you think of Native American art in Sedona, some family names come to mind: Hoel, Wilcox and, of course, Garland. The Garland family moved to Sedona from Phoenix in 1970 (they had spent years vacationing in Oak Creek Canyon), and in 1972, patriarch Bill Garland opened Garland’s Oak Creek Lodge. Not all families can work together, but it seemed to come natural to the Garlands.

Hanging Your Navajo Weaving

How to Hang Your Navajo Rug with Velcro. In our experience, Velcro is the easiest way to hang a rug. If you purchase a Navajo Rug from Garland's, we will provide you with Velcro for free if you wish to hang your rug on a wall. The velcro is self-adhesive and you can stick it directly to most surfaces.

Navajo Rugs - A Story Woven through Time

Navajo Rugs - A Story Woven through Time

All of our rugs are woven by Navajo weavers, most of whom live traditionally on the Navajo Reservation which is located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. This is the largest American Indian Reservation in the country, some 16 million acres with over 400,000 Navajos. From the inception of weaving by the Navajos around 1700, weaving has provided an important economic benefit to the tribe and a fine outlet for their artistic talents. Their rugs are made in the weaver's home or hogan on vertical looms using the same methods they have used for the past three hundred years. 

Navajo Yei and Yei-be-chai

“Yei” (pronounced “yay”) is the Navajo name for the benevolent supernatural beings who bring their healing power to medicinal ceremonies still performed today.

Navajo Rug Purses... Truly Wearable Art

Merging the worlds of fashion, art, and history, our Navajo Rug Purses truly are pieces of wearable art. The process of creating these beautiful handbags, clutches, wallets, and weekender bags is one that combines the talents of artists living a century apart, to ultimately bring our customers a durable, handmade piece of the Southwest that can be used every day.